We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
PURITAN MEDICAL

Download Mobile App





Testing for SARS-CoV-2 Blood Antigen Levels Can Predict Clinical Outcomes of COVID-19 Patients

By LabMedica International staff writers
Posted on 02 Sep 2022
Print article
Image: Colorized scanning electron micrograph of cell infected with Omicron strain of SARS-CoV-2 (Photo courtesy of NIH)
Image: Colorized scanning electron micrograph of cell infected with Omicron strain of SARS-CoV-2 (Photo courtesy of NIH)

The amount of SARS-CoV-2 antigen measured in the blood of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 is associated with illness severity and other clinical outcomes, according to a new study. Following the ACTIV-3 trial of COVID-19 therapeutics in people hospitalized with COVID-19, researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA), and their collaborators analyzed levels of SARS-COV-2 antigen in blood samples taken from study participants and assessed the association of those levels with disease progression. Higher levels of viral antigen in the blood, which could indicate ongoing SARS-CoV-2 replication, correlated with more severe disease. The researchers suggest that SARS-CoV-2 antigen levels hold promise as a biomarker, or a measurable substance, to predict which patients hospitalized with COVID-19 have a higher risk of worse outcomes.

The ACTIV-3 trial enrolled people hospitalized with COVID-19 between August 2020 and November 2021. Participants contributed a baseline blood sample and were then randomized to receive either an experimental COVID-19 therapeutic or a placebo. All participants received the antiviral remdesivir unless contraindicated. In this follow-up analysis, the researchers examined 2,540 participant baseline blood samples for SARS-CoV-2 antigen levels. The researchers assessed the relationship between each participant’s SARS-CoV-2 blood antigen levels and their time to discharge from the hospital, as well as their pulmonary symptoms at day five of the trial - whether they had stayed the same, worsened, or improved since enrollment.

With all this information in hand, the researchers conducted statistical analyses to determine if plasma antigen levels were associated with the participants’ pulmonary function when they gave the blood sample - and whether they could predict how the participants would fare over time. In addition, the researchers examined the relationship between a number of participant and viral characteristics and antigen levels. The analysis revealed a strong correlation between higher SARS-CoV-2 antigen levels (≥1000 nanograms per liter) and worse pulmonary function at the time of enrollment. Importantly, participants with higher SARS-CoV-2 antigen levels in the blood at enrollment generally had decreased pulmonary function at day five, regardless of the severity of their illness at the time of study entry, and took longer to be released from the hospital.

High blood antigen levels also correlated with some known risk factors for worse illness, such as being male. Three additional participant characteristics were found to correlate with lower antigen levels: the presence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, exposure to remdesivir prior to enrollment and longer time in hospital prior to enrollment. Finally, participants infected with the delta variant had higher antigen levels than those infected with prior circulating strains. The researchers concluded that antigen levels in the blood are likely a marker of ongoing viral replication and could be useful for predicting a patient’s disease progression and likely outcomes once they are admitted to the hospital. The researchers note that these results suggest that a precision medicine approach could be helpful in future clinical trials of antiviral therapy. For instance, antigen levels could help determine those patients most likely to benefit from therapies directed at fighting the virus.

Related Links:
National Institutes of Health 

Gold Supplier
COVID-19, Flu A/B Multiplex RT-PCRTest
TaqPath COVID-19, FluA, FluB Combo Kit
New
Laboratory Software
PHORESIS CORE
New
Diagnostic Salivary Cortisol ELISA Kit
Salimetrics Cortisol Enzyme Immunoassay Kit
New
Human IgE Immunochromatography Test
ImmuneCheck IgE

Print article
MEDLAB - INFORMA

Channels

Immunology

view channel
Image: Scientists have won USD 9.5 million to study emerging pathogens (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Study of Emerging Pathogens to Better Understand Influenza-Antibody Interactions Could Improve Diagnostics

Outbreaks of Avian influenza have occurred around the world for over a century. The highly pathogenic H5N1 virus which was first identified in 1996 can lead to severe disease and has a high fatality rate... Read more

Microbiology

view channel
Image: Medical illustration of Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriacea (Photo courtesy of CDC, Stephanie Rossow)

Breakthrough Test Enables Targeted Antibiotic Therapy for Various Enterobacter Species

Bacteria of the Enterobacter genus are considered to be the most dangerous bacteria linked to hospital infections across the world. Some of their representatives demonstrate high resistance to commonly-used... Read more

Technology

view channel
Image: Flexible copper sensor made cheaply from ordinary materials (Photo courtesy of University of São Paulo)

Low-Cost Portable Sensor Detects Heavy Metals in Sweat

Heavy metals like lead and cadmium can be found in batteries, cosmetics, food and many other things that have become a part of daily life. However, they become toxic if they accumulate in the human body... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2023 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.