We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
Abbott Diagnostics- Hematology Division

Download Mobile App





New Sensor Uses `Glow-in-the-Dark` Signal to Indicate Presence of Molecules Associated with COVID-19 in Blood

By LabMedica International staff writers
Posted on 29 Jul 2021
Print article
Image: New Sensor Uses `Glow-In-The-Dark` Signal to Indicate Presence of Molecules Associated with COVID-19 in Blood (Photo courtesy of Bas Rosier and Maarten Merkx (TU/e))
Image: New Sensor Uses `Glow-In-The-Dark` Signal to Indicate Presence of Molecules Associated with COVID-19 in Blood (Photo courtesy of Bas Rosier and Maarten Merkx (TU/e))
A new sensor with bioluminescent proteins indicates the presence of anti-drug antibodies and molecules associated with COVID-19 in the blood.

A research team at Eindhoven University of Technology (Eindhoven, Netherlands) and Utrecht University (Utrecht, the Netherlands) has developed a new type of sensor that combines the sensitivity and accuracy of current laboratory-based measurements with the speed and low-cost of current home tests. The new sensor uses a “glow-in-the-dark” signal to indicate the presence of tiny amounts proteins and anti-drug antibodies, as well as COVID-19 spike proteins and antibodies in blood.

Home test kits to check for COVID-19 spike proteins and anti-COVID-19 antibodies are fast and simple to use but lack the sensitivity and accuracy of laboratory tests. Another issue with these so-called point-of-use home tests is that they are not accurate enough. With all of this in mind, the research team developed a new test approach with the accuracy and sensitivity of current laboratory-based methods and the speed and low-cost of existing point-of-use tests. The key to detecting and indicating the presence of biomarkers or molecules of interest is bioluminescence, the process that organisms such as fireflies use to produce light. The researchers tested the new sensing approach on a variety of biomarkers, including one to detect bacterial and viral infections (C-reactive protein), using 40 patient samples.

The RAPPID testing platform is definitely rapid in nature, and with a suitable sample holder can be used in conjunction with a smartphone, meaning that it has the potential to be used by anyone, anywhere. However, some work still needs to be done before his new testing platform will become available to the wider public.

“Our new sensor is based on bioluminescence, which we have used extensively in our previous research. If a certain protein or antibody is present in the sample, special proteins called luciferase enzymes will emit light,” said Maarten Merkx from the institute for Complex Molecular Systems (ICMS) at TU/e and research lead for the new study. “In other words, we look for a ‘glow-in-the-dark’ response.”

“We envisage that this testing platform could be used for a broad range of applications such as in rapid screening and testing, for therapeutic antibody-drug monitoring associated with conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease, and for the rapid detection of infectious diseases that could be associated with future epidemics or pandemics,” added Merkx.

Related Links:
Eindhoven University of Technology
Utrecht University


Gold Supplier
SARS-CoV2 Antigen Rapid Test
SARS-CoV2 Antigen Rapid Test
New
Gold Supplier
Automated Immune Analyzer
UNION Immune Analyzer
New
Silver Supplier
COVID-19 IgG-IgM Rapid Test
COVID-19 IgG-IgM Rapid Test
New
Laboratory Information System (LIS)
GLIMS 10

Print article

Channels

Pathology

view channel
Image: The CellSearch Circulating Tumor Cell Kit is intended for the enumeration of circulating tumor cells of epithelial origin (CD45-, EpCAM+, and cytokeratins 8, 18+, and/or 19+ and PD-L1) in whole blood (Photo courtesy of CellSearch/Menarini Silicon Biosystems)

PD-L1 Expression in Circulating Tumor Cells Investigated for NSCLC

In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), analysis of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a potential alternative to overcome the problems linked to the... Read more

Industry

view channel
Illustration

Global Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction (dPCR) Market Projected to Reach Close to USD 1.15 Billion by 2028

The global digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) market is projected to grow at a CAGR of more than 9% from over USD 0.50 billion in 2020 to nearly USD 1.15 billion by 2028, driven primarily by rising... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2021 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.