We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
RANDOX LABORATORIES

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.

Graphene-Based Sensor That Detects SARS-CoV-2 Could Mark Breakthrough in Coronavirus Detection

By LabMedica International staff writers
Posted on 28 Jun 2021
Print article
Image: An illustration of the graphene-based COVID-19 spike protein detection process developed at UIC (Photo courtesy of Vikas Berry)
Image: An illustration of the graphene-based COVID-19 spike protein detection process developed at UIC (Photo courtesy of Vikas Berry)
Researchers have successfully used graphene - one of the strongest, thinnest known materials - to detect the SARS-CoV-2 virus in laboratory experiments.

Researchers at the University of Illinois (Chicago, IL, USA) who made the discovery believe that it could be a breakthrough in coronavirus detection, with potential applications in the fight against COVID-19 and its variants. In experiments, researchers combined sheets of graphene, which are more than 1,000 times thinner than a postage stamp, with an antibody designed to target the infamous spike protein on the coronavirus. They then measured the atomic-level vibrations of these graphene sheets when exposed to COVID-positive and COVID-negative samples in artificial saliva. These sheets were also tested in the presence of other coronaviruses, like Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS-CoV. The researchers found that the vibrations of the antibody-coupled graphene sheet changed when treated with a COVID-positive sample, but not when treated with a COVID-negative sample or with other coronaviruses. Vibrational changes, measured with a device called a Raman spectrometer, were evident in under five minutes.

Graphene - which has been called a “wonder material” - has unique properties that make it highly versatile, making this type of sensor possible. Graphene is a single-atom-thick material made up of carbon. Carbon atoms are bound by chemical bonds whose elasticity and movement can produce resonant vibrations, also known as phonons, which can be very accurately measured. When a molecule like a SARS-CoV-2 molecule interacts with graphene, it changes these resonant vibrations in a very specific and quantifiable way.

“There is a clear need in society for better ways to quickly and accurately detect COVID and its variants, and this research has the potential to make a real difference. The modified sensor is highly sensitive and selective for COVID, and it is fast and inexpensive,” said Vikas Berry, professor and head of chemical engineering at the UIC College of Engineering and senior author of the paper. “Graphene is just one atom thick, so a molecule on its surface is relatively enormous and can produce a specific change in its electronic energy. In this experiment, we modified graphene with an antibody and, in essence, calibrated it to react only with the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. Using this method, graphene could similarly be used to detect COVID-19 variants.”

Related Links:
University of Illinois

New
Gold Supplier
Novel Corona Virus (SARS-CoV-2) Ag Rapid Test Kit
Novel Corona Virus (SARS-CoV-2) Ag Rapid Test Kit (Prepacked)
New
Gold Supplier
Nucleic Acid Extraction System
SMPE-960
New
Laboratory Automation System
autioclart
New
Digital Test Reader
ellume•lab

Print article

Channels

Molecular Diagnostics

view channel
Image: Primary angle closure glaucoma can cause permanent blindness if not treated quickly. A highly sensitive genetic test has been developed (Photo courtesy of Flinders University)

Highly Sensitive Genetic Test for Glaucoma Developed

In open-angle glaucoma, the angle in the eye where the iris meets the cornea is as wide and open as it should be, but the eye’s drainage canals become clogged over time, causing an increase in internal... Read more

Industry

view channel
Illustration

ELITechGroup Acquires Freezing Point Osmometry Provider GONOTEC

ELITechGroup (Puteaux, France) has acquired GONOTEC (Berlin, Germany), thus uniting two osmometry market leaders. The acquisition will also provides the industry with a full range of osmometry solutions... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2021 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.