We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.
Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
RANDOX LABORATORIES

Download Mobile App




Blood Protein Signature Reported for Diabetic Kidney Disease

By Labmedica International staff writers
Posted on 09 May 2019
Print article
Image: Nodular glomerulosclerosis in the kidney of a patient with diabetic nephropathy; the acellular light purple areas within the capillary tufts are the destructive mesangial matrix deposits (Photo courtesy of the CDC).
Image: Nodular glomerulosclerosis in the kidney of a patient with diabetic nephropathy; the acellular light purple areas within the capillary tufts are the destructive mesangial matrix deposits (Photo courtesy of the CDC).
Diabetic nephropathy or diabetic kidney disease (DKD), is a result of vascular abnormalities that accompany diabetes and increases mortality risk. Furthermore, diabetes mellitus is a main risk factor for end-stage renal disease, the most advanced stage of kidney disease.

Chronic inflammation is postulated to be involved in the development of end-stage renal disease in diabetes, but which specific circulating inflammatory proteins contribute to this risk remain unknown. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) in diabetes is a life threatening complication resulting in a poor prognosis for patients as well as high medical costs.

An international team of scientists led by the Harvard Medical School (Boston, MA, USA) examined 194 circulating inflammatory proteins in subjects from three independent cohorts with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In each cohort, they identified an extremely robust kidney risk inflammatory signature (KRIS), consisting of 17 proteins enriched in tumor necrosis factor-receptor superfamily members, that was associated with a 10-year risk of end-stage renal disease. All these proteins had a systemic, non-kidney source.

The type 1 diabetes group included 108 individuals who developed end-stage renal disease during the study's follow up time, while 35 of the individuals with type 2 diabetes had kidney disease that advanced to that point. Half a dozen of the proteins came from tumor necrosis factor receptor super-families, while the remaining proteins represented receptor or secreted proteins. The team used a custom SOMAscan array (SomaLogic, Boulder, CO, USA), and assessed 194 circulating proteins, focusing on inflammatory proteins and proteins previously implicated in diabetic kidney disease, in blood samples from 219 individuals with type 1 diabetes and a validation group of 144 type 2 diabetes patients, all with some level of kidney impairment.

The authors concluded that these proteins point to new therapeutic targets and new prognostic tests to identify subjects at risk of end-stage renal disease, as well as biomarkers to measure responses to treatment of diabetic kidney disease. Andrzej S. Krolewski, MD, PhD, the senior author of the study, said, “These proteins point to new therapeutic targets and new prognostic tests to identify subjects at risk of end-stage renal disease, as well as biomarkers to measure responses to treatment of diabetic kidney disease.” The study was published on April 22, 2019, in the journal Nature Medicine.

Related Links:
Harvard Medical School
SomaLogic


Print article

Channels

Copyright © 2000-2019 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.