We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
BIO-RAD LABORATORIES

Download Mobile App




Revolutionary Transistor Could Allow Wearable Devices to Measure Sodium and Potassium in Blood

By LabMedica International staff writers
Posted on 23 Jan 2023
Print article
Image: The vertical electrochemical transistor is based on a new kind of electronic polymer and a vertical, instead of planar architecture (Photo courtesy of Northwestern University)
Image: The vertical electrochemical transistor is based on a new kind of electronic polymer and a vertical, instead of planar architecture (Photo courtesy of Northwestern University)

Researchers have developed a revolutionary transistor that could be suitable for lightweight, flexible, high-performance bioelectronics. The electrochemical transistor is compatible with blood and water and can amplify important signals, paving the way for its application in biomedical sensing. The transistor could allow for the use of wearable devices for onsite signal processing, right at the biology-device interface. Some of its likely applications could be for measuring heartbeat and the levels of sodium and potassium in blood, as well as eye motion in studies of sleep disorders.

The vertical electrochemical transistor developed by a transdisciplinary research team at Northwestern University (Evanston, IL, USA) is based on a new kind of electronic polymer and a vertical, instead of planar, architecture. The transistor conducts electricity as well as ions, and is stable in air. The design and synthesis of the new materials, and the fabrication and characterization of the transistor was made possible by the collaborative expertise of chemists, materials scientists and biomedical engineers in the research team.

In order to make electronic circuits more reliable and powerful, there is a need for two types of transistors: p-type transistors that carry positive charges and n-type transistors that carry negative charges. These types of circuits are called complementary circuits. In the past, researchers have faced a challenge in building n-type transistors which are also typically unstable. The work by the transdisciplinary research team is the first to demonstrate electrochemical transistors with similar and very high performance for both types (p+n) of electrochemical transistors. This helped the researchers fabricate highly efficient electrochemical complementary circuits.

“All modern electronics use transistors, which rapidly turn current on and off,” said Tobin J. Marks, a co-corresponding author of the study. “Here we use chemistry to enhance the switching. Our electrochemical transistor takes performance to a totally new level. You have all the properties of a conventional transistor but far higher transconductance (a measure of the amplification it can deliver), ultra-stable cycling of the switching properties, a small footprint that can enable high density integration, and easy, low-cost fabrication.”

“This exciting new type of transistor allows us to speak the language of both biological systems, which often communicate via ionic signaling, and electronic systems, which communicate with electrons,” said Jonathan Rivnay, professor of biomedical engineering at the McCormick School. “The ability of the transistors to work very efficiently as ‘mixed conductors’ makes them attractive for bioelectronic diagnostics and therapies.”

Related Links:
Northwestern University 

Platinum Member
COVID-19 Rapid Test
OSOM COVID-19 Antigen Rapid Test
Magnetic Bead Separation Modules
MAG and HEATMAG
Anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Test
GPP-100 Anti-CCP Kit
New
Gold Member
Plasma Control
Plasma Control Level 1

Print article

Channels

Clinical Chemistry

view channel
Image: The 3D printed miniature ionizer is a key component of a mass spectrometer (Photo courtesy of MIT)

3D Printed Point-Of-Care Mass Spectrometer Outperforms State-Of-The-Art Models

Mass spectrometry is a precise technique for identifying the chemical components of a sample and has significant potential for monitoring chronic illness health states, such as measuring hormone levels... Read more

Hematology

view channel
Image: The CAPILLARYS 3 DBS devices have received U.S. FDA 510(k) clearance (Photo courtesy of Sebia)

Next Generation Instrument Screens for Hemoglobin Disorders in Newborns

Hemoglobinopathies, the most widespread inherited conditions globally, affect about 7% of the population as carriers, with 2.7% of newborns being born with these conditions. The spectrum of clinical manifestations... Read more

Immunology

view channel
Image: The AI predictive model identifies the most potent cancer killing immune cells for use in immunotherapies (Photo courtesy of Shutterstock)

AI Predicts Tumor-Killing Cells with High Accuracy

Cellular immunotherapy involves extracting immune cells from a patient's tumor, potentially enhancing their cancer-fighting capabilities through engineering, and then expanding and reintroducing them into the body.... Read more

Microbiology

view channel
Image: The T-SPOT.TB test is now paired with the Auto-Pure 2400 liquid handling platform for accurate TB testing (Photo courtesy of Shutterstock)

Integrated Solution Ushers New Era of Automated Tuberculosis Testing

Tuberculosis (TB) is responsible for 1.3 million deaths every year, positioning it as one of the top killers globally due to a single infectious agent. In 2022, around 10.6 million people were diagnosed... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2024 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.