We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
Abbott Diagnostics- Hematology Division

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.

AI Combined with Genomic Surveillance Beats Humans at Detecting Infectious Disease Outbreaks in Hospital Settings

By LabMedica International staff writers
Posted on 23 Nov 2021
Print article
Image: Dr. Lee Harrison and Alex Sundermann load samples for genomic sequencing (Photo courtesy of Nathan Langer/UPMC)
Image: Dr. Lee Harrison and Alex Sundermann load samples for genomic sequencing (Photo courtesy of Nathan Langer/UPMC)

By coupling machine learning with whole genome sequencing, scientists have greatly improved the quick detection of infectious disease outbreaks within a hospital setting over traditional methods for tracking outbreaks.

The process developed by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine (Pittsburgh, PA, USA) and Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA, USA) indicates a way for health systems to identify and then stop hospital-based infectious disease outbreaks in their tracks, cutting costs and saving lives. The Enhanced Detection System for Healthcare-Associated Transmission (EDS-HAT) couples the recent development of affordable genomic sequencing with computer algorithms connected to the vast trove of data in electronic health records. When the sequencing detects that any two or more patients in a hospital have near-identical strains of an infection, machine learning quickly mines those patients’ electronic health records for commonalities – whether that be close proximity of hospital beds, a procedure using the same equipment or a shared health care provider – alerting infection preventionists to investigate and halt further transmission.

Ordinarily, this process requires clinicians to notice that two or more patients have a similar infection and alert their infection prevention team, which can then review patient records to attempt to find how the infection was transmitted. From November 2016 to November 2018, UPMC Presbyterian Hospital ran EDS-HAT with a six-month lag for a few select infectious pathogens often associated with health care-acquired infections nationwide, while continuing with real-time, traditional infection prevention methods. The team then investigated how well EDS-HAT performed. EDS-HAT detected 99 clusters of similar infections in that two-year period and identified at least one potential transmission route in 65.7% of those clusters. During the same period, infection prevention used whole genome sequencing to aid in the investigation of 15 suspected outbreaks, two of which revealed genetically related infections. If EDS-HAT had been running in real-time, the team estimates as many as 63 transmissions of an infectious disease from one patient to another could have been prevented. It also would have saved the hospital as much as USD 692,500.

In one case-study, EDS-HAT found an outbreak of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium that it traced to an interventional radiology procedure involving injection of sterile contrast that was being performed according to manufacturer instructions. Due to EDS-HAT detecting the outbreak, UPMC alerted the manufacturer to the instructions that led to faulty sterilization practices. UPMC plans to introduce EDS-HAT in real-time at UPMC Presbyterian Hospital and expects this innovation to benefit other infection prevention and control programs in the future. And the original EDS-HAT, which primarily focused on drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, will soon be expanding to incorporate sequencing of respiratory viruses, including COVID-19.

“The current method used by hospitals to find and stop infectious disease transmission among patients is antiquated. These practices haven’t changed significantly in over a century,” said senior author Lee Harrison, M.D., professor of infectious diseases at Pitt’s School of Medicine and epidemiology at Pitt’s Graduate School of Public Health. “Our process detects important outbreaks that would otherwise fly under the radar of traditional infection prevention monitoring.”

Related Links:
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine 
Carnegie Mellon University 

Gold Supplier
SARS-COV-2 PLUS UK Real Time PCR kit
SARS-COV-2 PLUS UK REALTIME PCR KIT
New
Bulk Sorter
BL 1200 SORT CONNECT
New
Assayed Hemoglobin Control
https://www.eurotrol.com/en/spotlights/hemotrol-wb/
New
Molecular Diagnostic Platform
VERIGENE II System

Print article

Channels

Molecular Diagnostics

view channel
Image: Absence of nuclear immunohistochemical staining of MSH2 protein (A) and presence of MLH1 protein (B) in urothelial cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder of a patient carrying a germline MSH2 mutation. Observe the nuclear staining in stromal cells as an internal control (Photo courtesy of Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre)

Simple Urine Test Detects Urothelial Cancers in Lynch Syndrome Patients

Lynch Syndrome (LS) is an inherited genetic disorder that carries a high risk of cancer. LS is caused by mutations affecting MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 genes. More than one in 300 people have LS but most... Read more

Hematology

view channel
Image: The Gazelle Hb Variant Test for screening, diagnosis and management of sickle cell disease and related hemoglobinopathies at the point of care (Photo courtesy of Hemex Health)

Point-of-Care Device Accurately Rapidly Diagnoses Sickle Cell Disease

Hemoglobinopathies are the most common autosomal hereditary disorders. Approximately 7% of the global population carries hemoglobin gene mutation including structural hemoglobin variants like sickle hemoglobin... Read more

Immunology

view channel
Image: The IMMULITE 2000 XPi Immunoassay System provides multiple tests on a single, easy-to-use analyzer, including the thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin assay (Photo courtesy of Siemens Healthcare)

Immunoassays Evaluated for Thyroid-Stimulating Receptor Antibody in Graves’ Disease

Graves' disease (GD), also known as toxic diffuse goiter, is an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid. It frequently results in and is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism and it also often results... Read more

Microbiology

view channel
Image: The sciREADER CL2 enables high quality digital colorimetric imaging of various support formats (Photo courtesy of SCIENION)

Multiplex Immunoassay Developed for Confirmation and Typing of HTLV Infections

Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Viruses (HTLV) type 1 and type 2 account for an estimated five to 10 million infections worldwide and are transmitted through breast feeding, sexual contacts and contaminated... Read more

Pathology

view channel
Illustration

AI Accurately Detects and Diagnoses Colorectal Cancer from Tissue Scans As Well or Better Than Pathologists

Artificial intelligence (A) can accurately detect and diagnose colorectal cancer from tissue scans as well or better than pathologists, according to a new study. The study, which was conducted by researchers... Read more

Technology

view channel
Image: PKeye Workflow Monitor System (Photo courtesy of PerkinElmer, Inc.)

PerkinElmer’s New Cloud-Based Platform Enables Laboratory Personnel to Remotely Manage Its Instruments in Real-Time

PerkinElmer, Inc. (Waltham, MA; USA) has launched its PKeye Workflow Monitor, a cloud-based platform enabling laboratory personnel to remotely manage and monitor their PerkinElmer instruments and workflows... Read more

Industry

view channel
Illustration

Global Point of Care Diagnostics Market to Top USD 35 Billion by 2027 Due to Rising Diabetic Cases

The global point of care diagnostics market is projected to grow at a CAGR of close to 6% from more than USD 23 billion in 2020 to over USD 35 billion by 2027, driven by an increase in the number of diabetic... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2021 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.